Bloom Thyme Friday: The Charm of Rugosas

Rugosa roses are species roses native to eastern Asia. These profuse spring bloomers are hardy in Zones 3 – 9 and in a variety of conditions: heat, cold, wind, even salty, sandy seaside conditions. Rugosa roses prefers full sun (6-8 hours per day) and average well-drained soil. So, with very minimal care, almost anyone, anywhere can enjoy these dependable workhorses in the garden.  As for their size, Hansa, Roseraie de la Hay, Theresa Bugnet and Blanc de double Corbert  are 5′ X 5′ in my garden. Moje Hammerly is 4′ X 4′ and Belle Poitevine is 4 X4 too. There are other rugosas that are smaller in general … do some investigating to find the ones most suited for your location. For more on rugosas, go to the ARS website HERE.

These rugged plants are excellent choices for the organic gardener. Their distinct wrinkled (regose) foliage is very disease resistant.

In my cottage garden they are the back drop and anchor for many of my flower beds. They give me a most outstanding introduction to the garden season with their striking, prolific bloom and the intense fragrance that permeates the entire garden. And, as repeat bloomers, they provide fragrant blooms throughout the season. And, beautiful roses hips to enjoy in our fall garden.

Nothing in my garden is quite like the first bloom cycle of my rugosa roses. See what you think…

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Hansa
Hansa

Hansa: Beautiful foliage and striking magenta blooms.

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Moje Hammarberg

Moje Hammarberg: More compact in growth but equal in bloom power and fragrance.

Roseraie de la Hay
Roseraie de la Hay

Roseraie de laHay: My favorite and the largest of the rugosas in my garden. named for the French rose garden of the same name

 

Blanc de double Corbert
Blanc de double Corbert

Double de Coubert: Pure white flowers and strong fragrance.

If you have some space and are looking for a rose with a major impact, think about rugosas!

Bloom Thyme Friday

HAPPY BLOOM THYME FRIDAY!

Bloom Thyme Friday: Garden Blogger Mecca

P. Allen Smith has created Mecca for garden bloggers … GARDEN 2 BLOG.

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A place for information, inspiration, refreshment, education and community! All in one of the most beautiful places on earth — his Moss Mountain home. Take a look here!

There are so many highlights of this beautiful retreat, but I can honestly tell you that I can’t wait for my return visit to Allen’s beautiful rose garden. Allen is a true lover of roses and is committed to a beautiful AND sustainable rose garden.  See the pictures here.

Allen is a gracious host and garden friend. Here is what he says of his Moss Mountain Retreat…

For several years now I have been touting the idea of the Garden Home, a place that blurs the lines between indoors and out. It is my belief that a Garden Home is not just about beautifying our surroundings or extending our living space; it also helps us stay close to the earth and reminds us to be good stewards of our environment.

The Garden Home is about living life at its natural best. I believe we can create a stylish lifestyle in keeping with the tradition of the past, while taking full advantage of modern innovations and still be good stewards of the earth.

I am honored to be invited for a return visit to Garden 2 Blog. I am looking forward to seeing all the changes to Moss Mountain, visiting with so many special friends and meeting new friends! A wonderful group to learn and grow with!

SPONSORS…

Many sponsors of garden/home related products are a part of making this special event happen and will join us to share the latest and greatest from their world. I’ll keep you updated!

 The best of the best from the world of gardening..
    • Proven Winners
    • Berry Family of Nurseries
    • Bonnie Plants
    • Laguna Ponds
    • Jobe’s Organics
    • Troy Bilt
    • Flexilla
    • Heritage Seeds
    • Wild Bird Feeds
    • Le Creuset

GARDEN PROJECTS…

A part of Garden 2 Blog is fun garden projects. Our first project started last week with a video “throw down” for Jobe’s Organics. Jobe’s sent us all the “ingredients” for a container garden of our choice.

Here’s my video…

 

This picture gallery will give you a glimpse of Garden 2 Blog 2013…

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I  hope things are going well in your world this week. Leave a comment and let me know what’s going on in your garden!

Bloom Thyme Friday

HAPPY BLOOM THYME FRIDAY!

The Benefits of Dr. Bronner…

We have used Dr. Bronner’s Castile soap as an insecticide for many years. We find it works wonders in the garden and, if you choose the peppermint or lavender, it takes the experience to a whole ‘nother level. 🙂

10770140_120613143000My good garden friend Jack Falker from Minnesota recently wrote an extensive article about the use of soap in the garden…

FROM THE MINNESOTA GARDENER
(link)
Got Castile Soap? –
Jack Falker

After publishing my last post on spraying non-toxic stuff, instead of the usual fungicides and pesticides, I was reminded by my good friends, Diane and Dick Lawson that they are spraying almost exclusively Castile soap on their garden (which is one of the nicest in the Twin Cities).

I asked Diane, a recently retired high school physics teacher, to explain exactly what Castile soap is vs. the liquid dishwashing soap I’ve been using and was recommending in my article. I was surprised when Diane told me that Castile soap is made primarily from olive and other vegetable oils, which presumably leave a beneficial coating on the plants, vs. detergent soap. In other words, Castile soap is a natural surfactant that remains on the surface of the leaves, much as a surfactant fungicide might, as well as acting as a deterrent to insects.

I remember using Diane and Dick’s Castile formula on my garden a few years ago and that was the summer I saw virtually no thrips or aphids. Diane would contend that’s the case in her garden every year.

Until now, my problem with using Castile soap has been the laborious preparation. They use “Kirk’s” Castile soap in bars, which has to be dissolved in water and then mixed into your sprayer. Their procedure is to dissolve half a bar of Kirk’s in a gallon of water and then mix one cup of that soap mixture into each gallon of spray mixture. For example, for five gallons of soap spray, you would use five cups of the Kirk’s/water mixture.

After talking to Diane the other night and remembering that I didn’t enjoy dissolving bars of soap in water, I “Googled” Castile soap to better understand it and here is what I found… (link) (which includes a picture of a bar of Kirk’s).

I also found this story about making your own Castile insecticidal soap. (link)

If you Google: “Castile soap insecticide” you will find several other articles, as well.

I also found that Target sells Dr. Bronner’s Castile soap in liquid form, so that means you don’t have to dissolve bars of soap in water to use it. Here is the Target shopping site for Castile soap. (link)

I enlarged the label of Dr. Bronner’s Castile Soap and here are the ingredients: Organic coconut and olive oils, organic hemp oil, organic jojoba oil, lavandin extract, organic lavender oil, citric acid, and vitamin E. Now that sounds like something I wouldn’t mind spraying on my roses and, if I happen to get some on me, I’ll just lather up and wash it off!

I believe that adding baking soda to the Castile soap mixture at a rate of 3 TBP per gallon would probably make it a better fungicide, as well.

You could also substitute 2 TBP of Castile soap for the dishwashing detergent in the cider vinegar/aspirin, soap mixture I recommended in my last post (link).

Thanks Jack for such thorough information!

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I hope you are having a great September and enjoying the last days of summer. Yesterday we had a very beautiful misty morning…

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Misty Morning in Farm Country…

It won’t be long until I will be counting down the days until spring. 🙂