Spring Rose Care

When spring comes it’s time for gardeners to roll up their sleeves and  get busy and I can’t wait!

Here are some tips that I follow for getting my roses off to a good start in my Zone 5b garden.

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Garden June 2016

 

1. PLANTING

For early April planting, I buy bare root roses from online vendors (my preferred list here). When they arrive they are “bare roots” wrapped in wet newspaper. Very humble beginnings for a plant that will be so lovely later!

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A good moo poo start...
Bare roots soaking in Moo Poo Tea…

I immediately unpack them and soak them in a bucket of Moo Poo tea for 24 hours before planting.

Planting decisions are dependent on the type of rose…

Grafted Roses: Many hybrid teas, floribunda and grandifloras are grafted roses.

This means that a rose is created by being grafted onto strong, hardy rootstock, creating a “bud union.” Plant the bud union (knobby part just above the roots) 3” below the soil line to protect it from harsh winters we often have.

Own Root Roses: These roses were started from cuttings and are on their own root, so there is no bud union to protect. I plant them as I would any other shrub.

Soil: We ask roses to bloom for us all summer, year after year, so it is best to give them a good start by planting them in good, rich soil. Our neck of the woods has horrible gray clay soil so we dig BIG holes–holes much deeper and wider than the root system to allow for soil amendments and deep enough to protect the bud union. (At least 18″ by 18″.) To the soil removed, we add compost and a quality grade of top soil. Your roses will appreciate your gifts of more nutrients and better drainage and will reward you handsomely! You will never regret giving your roses a good foundation.

Roses Already in Leaf and Bloom…

If you purchased something from a garden center that is already leafed out and perhaps has buds or blooms, wait until the frost date has passed to plant them in the garden. In my zone that date is May 10. I have two beautiful Dee-Lish roses waiting patiently in the Potting Shed as I type. I will confess to occassionally planting a little earlier than May 10, but you have to be prepared to cover them if frosty nights come!! #notpatient


2. PRUNING

First tip: DON’T BE AFRAID TO PRUNE. I’ve made countless “mistakes” through the years and the roses always forgive and come back!

Here in the midwest, it is  difficult to know when winter is really over and it is time to prune. For many years, I have let the forsythia tell me. When the forsythia is blooming, I start pruning. This year the temps have been up and down and there has been a lot of pressure on the forsythia. So use your best judgement! 😬

MOST of the time, the forsythia plan works.

Tools of the trade…

You will need protective gloves and a sharp pair of pruners. My choices are Bionic Gloves and Barnel Pruners from Wendy Tilley, owner of The Rose Gardener Garden Shop and Harlane Garden Labels.

Different types of roses have different pruning needs. Read more about pruning here.

The Ingenious Mr. Fairchild from last summer. Amazing David Austin!
The Ingenious Mr. Fairchild from last summer. Amazing David Austin

3. FERTILIZE

Once our roses are starting to grow, it’s time for fertilizer. Most any fertilizer will do—but do read labels carefully–too much of a good thing can be harmful! I use a combination of Moo Poo Tea, Mills Magic Mix and inorganic fertilizer on my roses. Fertilizer applications are about 6 weeks apart for most of my roses. Old Garden Roses and Rugosas are fertilized in the spring. Shrubs and Knockouts are only fertilized twice a season–spring and summer.

4. WATERING

Once the fertilizer has been applied, you will want to give your roses a deep watering to get those nutrients down to where they can do some good.

A good rule of thumb is to water at the base of the plant especially if you are watering in the evening, as wet rose leaves are more susceptible to fungal diseases (e.g. Black Spot & Powdery Mildew). Although, if I am watering in the morning I give them a good all-over shower. This is great way to remove dirt and any insects that have shown up for the tasty and tender buds! I think roses appreciate a refreshing shower just as we do, just don’t put them to bed wet.


5. MULCHING

This is one of my favorite parts. Mulch is so good for your roses … retains moisture, helps to keep down weeds and gives the garden that fresh, finished look!

One thing to remember when applying mulch … when mulch breaks down, it uses nitrogen in the process, so add a layer of compost on top of the soil before you add the mulch layer then the nitrogen in the soil can be used by the rose. If you are working in an established bed and last year’s mulch is still there, leave it… it becomes a “compost layer.” Win. Win.

Our Lady of Guadelupe and neighbors.
Our Lady of Guadalupe and neighbors.

MY FAVORITE TIP…

My favorite tip is to visit your roses daily or as often as you can to enjoy their beauty and to get to know them. Getting to know them can be key in early detection of any pest or disease.

And, when you have beautiful roses outside, who can stay in!

What Roses Should I Add?

Since Christmas has come and gone, I have been working on my garden lists…

  • Seeds to buy. (So far I’ve ordered several packs of Sonata Mix Cosmos and Cannes Mix Larkspur-great rose companions!)
  • Perennials to add. (I totally want more peonies!)
  • Annuals to add. (I’m looking at the new ones out!)

And, TRYING TO DECIDE WHAT ROSES TO ADD!

With a moved tree I found a bit more sun and am happily finding roses and companions to fill that sunny spot!

On order so far are 3 Mother of Pearl roses from Roses Unlimited. Look at these blooms!

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Photo courtesy of Marci Martin.

Pat Henry of Roses Unlimited is lovingly caring for them until ship date in late April! I fell in love with this rose at the Biltmore in September. The experience of seeing an entire section filled with this beauty was enhanced by my friend Marci Martin standing beside me regaling with stories of how beautiful and healthy this rose was in her Connecticut garden last year. I was sold! Marci could sell me most anything! 😃

Listen to Marci tell her story …


David Austins coming to my garden…

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Desdemona 

A medium size, fragrant shrub. These peach pink buds get to me! In an interview with Michael Marriott a few weeks ago, I found myself falling deeper and deeper in love with this one!

More details here.

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Ancient Mariner

Medium size shrub, disease resistant shrub with strong fragrance. Because you can NEVER and I mean never have too many pink roses. Ad says “masses of blooms” on this one. A pink, blooming machine … SOLD!

More info here.


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Maid Marion

Small, disease resistant shrub with light fragrance. More info about the rose here.

ROSES BRINGING PEOPLE TOGETHER…

As you know I love the stories behind rose names, so I wanted Maid Marion in my garden. At the helm of this story behind the story of the rose name is none other than my friend, Marci Martin. Marci had this rose named for someone very special. It’s a rose story you don’t want to miss! Read about Marion here.

Thank you Marci for all you did to make Gayle’s dream a reality.


WHAT DO YOU THINK?

So, you’ve seen the roses I am adding so far this year. Is there one that you think I need on my list? Please leave me a comment and tell me about it!

In the meantime, HAPPY VALENTINE’S DAY. Wishing you love, flowers and perhaps some chocolate!

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Fresh Start

Out with the old — in with new!

I just love flipping the calendar to a new year! A clean slate with endless possibilities! I am an optimist and always look forward to what’s around the corner … new plants to grow, new things to learn, new people to meet, more time and experiences with my family and friends and–the big one–watching my grand boys grow!!


So many blessings!

This weekend I’m working on my “add to the garden” list–serious fun! 😍 My work table is overflowing with ideas and inspiration!

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Wishing you a wonderful 2017!