These guys know how to say “welcome home”!

Last week when I left home for the Biltmore, there was not very much going on in the garden. (A post about the incredible Biltmore Rose Trials is coming very soon!)

Back to the garden… Something changed while I was gone. Rain. Lots of rain. The rain came and things started blooming! You can water and water and water but nothing is like a good soaking rain.

Caution... excessive garden pictures to follow...

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Lady Ashe

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Sunshine Daydream

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Belinda’s Dream

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Belinda’s Dream

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Petit Pink

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Quietness

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More Quietness

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Moje Hammarberg Rugosa

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Dick Clark

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Smoothie

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Flamenco Rosita

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Flamenco Rosita 2

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View from the Potting Shed porch.

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Some of them were ready to come inside!🙂

I am enjoying every single one of them! It’s gonna be hard to say goodbye for the winter. You are going to have to help me through it!

Wishing you a wonderful day and a warm welcome wherever you go!

A special couple, Sam and Nancy Jones

To say that Sam and Nancy Jones are special to my rose world is a gross understatement. Sam was the recipient of almost every award the rose community has to offer and held many leadership positions.

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These two strong compassionate leaders who just happen to love roses, have been so special to me and countless others. Their strong marriage, faith in Christ, rose knowledge and commitment to love others inspires us all.

In August at the ARS National Convention, Chaplain Sam opened the event with prayer. Afterwards, he sat down beside his lovely bride and suffered a major heart attack. I am grateful he was surrounded by the rose people he loved and who loved him in return.

A quote from his obituary reads,

Dr. Jones was a retired Minister of the United Methodist Church. He held a PhD in Counseling Psychology, and masters degrees in Psychology and Divinity. He was active in the American Rose Society, and West End United Methodist Church. He enjoyed gardening, his grandchildren, and traveling.

I personally will miss Sam forever, he was a special friend, but I am joyful knowing that on that day of loss for us, he was hearing, “Well done my good and faithful servant.”

Nancy is just as special! For a glimpse of Nancy’s wisdom and faith, listen to a recent Rose Chat podcast she recorded in our series, Voices from the Garden
 

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FALL ROSE CARE

Even though the temps are still high and the rain has decided to pour down on us, it’s time for me to admit that fall is near and winter is coming. Time to prepare the garden for the long winter’s nap. In my Zone 5b garden that could mean most anything as I’ve seen winters with more days than I care to count below 0 and then there are the mild midwest winters. From the blizzard of 1978 to the polar vortex to jacket weather–we’ve seen it all!

Regardless, good fall care makes spring all the sweeter.

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STOP FERTILIZING & DEADHEADING

About 6 weeks before expected frost, it is time to stop fertilizing and deadheading the roses. Since in my neck of the woods, the first frost date can be anywhere from October 5 – October 28.

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Stopping the deadheading process tells the roses it’s okay to begin to go to sleep and start producing seeds in the form of rose hips. (Read more about rose hips here.) Don’t trim those off either–the birds find them particularly yummy.

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Rose hips…

GENERAL CLEANUP

Remove all diseased leaves from around your roses. Black spot and other fungal diseases are not discouraged by cold temperatures and will just over winter and be there next spring– so they must go! Don’t add any of your diseased leaves to your compost pile … they will overwinter there too!

PRUNING

I don’t do much pruning in the fall (Read about spring care here.), unless there are rose canes that have gotten extra tall or spindly. Those I trim back to prevent them from flapping in those cold winter winds as there is a danger of loosening around the roots and making the roses more susceptible to damage from the cold. Pruning says, “Let’s get busy growing.” That is the wrong message to send in the fall!

MULCH

I think it is very important to add an extra layer of mulch to protect the roses through the winter. And, for roses that are more tender, I will mound the mulch much higher on them–to about 1/2 the height of the shrub.

NOW WHAT?

Now it’s time to sit back, relax and pour through those beautiful catalogs and websites and get to dreaming, plotting and planning. Spring will be here in about 174 days. 🙂


 

Although fall and winter are not my favorites, I am thankful for every season in life and in the garden. My heart knows that… He makes everything beautiful in its time. Ecclesiastes 3:11

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