BLOOM THYME FRIDAY: FIREWORKS BEGIN

I always refer to my spring bloom cycle as “fireworks and fragrance,” primarily because the rugosas and the old garden roses go crazy! I love it so much. And right now it is beginning. My first rugosa gave me the much anticipated first blooms and the other shrubs are loaded and just about ready to go.

Belle Poitevine…

Would you look at that center!


Soapwort… Has a short but beautiful bloom cycle. I love it that she’s early and holds her own even in the crazy spring weather.

Bloomerang Lilac still going strong… and filling the garden with fragrance! 

Rugosa buds…

Peonies…

Three beautiful roses came today from Roses Unlimited and they look fantastic. One Papi Delbard and 2 Mother of Pearls. EXCITING!!

MR. G HITS PAY DIRT!

Mr. G is over the moon excited with his new wheelbarrow. IT’S A CRAFTSMAN. Guys his age will understand his excitement with finding CRAFTSMAN anything these days – especially at Lowes as it was a Sears feature for so many years, but that’s another story. When he called me from Lowes to tell me of his good fortune, he failed to mention the wheelbarrow was RED — CRAFTSMAN RED.  🚒🔥🚨  All I could think was the numerous times in my youth when I was told not to wear pink and red together — they would clash. 💞❤️ 💞  You and I both know that my garden is filled to the brim with pink roses. So what am I to do. Of course I can try to photograph the garden around this “great wheelbarrow with a lifetime guarantee,” 🙄 or… you and I can play a game of WHERE’S WALDO / RED WHEELBARROW. When you see it in a picture, let me know and I’ll feature you in a post! 🤷‍♀️

Well, we wont’ lose it! 🙂 Plus, it holds a ton of mulch!✔️✔️✔️

HAPPY BLOOM THYME FRIDAY!

Light at the end of the tunnel?

From the look of the weekend weather report, there is light at the end of the tunnel. While I still am hearing from friends farther north that have snow, I am hoping our snow and plunging temps are behind us. Here in Zone 5b, our projected last frost date is May 10, so we will most likely get more “frosty” days but I sure hope not.

There has been a great deal of winter damage around here. Most of the roses (except the old garden roses and rugosas) will be pruned down to about 2-5″ from the ground. There are 3 or 4 that look as though they will not be back. We have been here before — although not recently! While the start will be slower and the bloom cycle will be later, history tells me most of them will be okay — in fact many might enjoy the severe haircut.

The biggest loss is the climbers. A shocking loss. One of which has been beautiful for so many years-New Dawn. You cried with me about that one last week. This week we are lamenting over another beloved rose… my Peggy Martin rose. Last year was the 3rd year in my garden and it was wonderful! I still see life, but it is at the ground and there is nothing above. 😦

Last year by the end of May she was up and over the trellis. Not gonna happen this year. But, it will be interesting to see how the recovery goes.

When I contacted my good friend, Peggy Martin, who the rose is named for, she said Oh, Honey don’t worry, I’ll “strike” you some cuttings. WOO HOO. These will be cuttings from the original Peggy Martin Rose in her garden. Can I just say, Peggy Martin is the best! If you ever get the chance to meet her as she travels around talking about old garden roses and her Peggy Martin rose, GO. She is a delight and a fountain of knowledge—dripping in southern charm. #nottobemissed  So just as I said last week, when God closes a door, he opens a window. 🙂

Me and Peggy… standing outside a lovely open door!

Regardless of all that “climber” sadness, there are many things bringing me garden joy today…

The Trillium are back!

My baby snapdragons — started from seeds I saved from last year’s beauties — had some time outside today. Behind them is my grandmother’s pitcher filled with mint that has been living in my potting shed all winter. I love this pitcher! My grandmother was a great gardener. The pitcher is a simple item she used in a very ordinary life but knowing that it was her’s, makes it extraordinary to me.

 

The rugosas were little affected by the horrible winter. They are champs!

Here is Therese Bugnet Rugosa today….

Rugosas from last June…

Too bad this picture isn’t scratch and sniff. Oh the fragrance! If you have a bit of room in your garden or want a living fence — grow rugosas! Bonus: they are very disease resistant — require no spray, in fact, those thick, wrinkled (rugose) leaves can be harmed by spray! Some varieties that I grow are …

  • Moje Hammarberg
  • Rosearie de La Hay
  • Hansa
  • Theresa Bugnet

All of these I would recommend.

It was a wonderful day in the garden. Spring is finally springing and there’s so much more to come!

I CAN’T WAIT!

What are some highlights of your garden this week?

I hope you enjoy every minute!

 

 

Bloom Thyme Friday: Rugged Roses and Rain


This has been a week of roses and rain. The rugosas are blooming a full two weeks early … and way ahead of anyone else. Even the peonies are not quite ready. And while they are trying to be gorgeous, the rains keep coming and beating them down. I just read the weather report and there is NO rain in the forecast for the next 4 days–yes! 😍☀️🌺🌹💃

Rugosas are often referred to as “rugged roses” because they can take most any condition. They are workhorses in my garden and they will most likely grow for you too. They are recommended for growing zones 3 – 9–which takes in a good many of us. If you are growing rugosas in the deep south, I would love to hear how they do and which ones you are growing. Occasionally I hear of people having trouble in our hottest areas.

I have about 15 rugosas … Hansa, Roseraie de la Hay, Therese Bugnet, Moje Hammarberg, Belle Pointevine and Blanc Double de Coubert. They form a thorny, beautiful, fragrant backdrop. The spring bloom is the most spectacular, but they do repeat bloom if you deadhead!

Here’s what mine are doing–in between downpours!

The largest one you see here is Roseraie de la Hay.
In front of the gate is Hansa.

If you turn up the volume, you can hear the birds on the video!

The lovely Therese Bugnet.
Roseraie de la Hay

 

Moje Hammarberg

Here is the fist bokay of the season. It may look gloomy outside this afternoon but it’s all lovely rose fragrance inside.

Early or late, these beauties are always welcome.


COMING ATTRACTIONS…

Look at this video of  Peggy Martin today … all loaded up with blooms. She’s gonna be amazing–just like her namesake! Stay tuned!


Rain or shine, I hope you are having a wonderful

BLOOM THYME FRIDAY!

Saying goodbye to August…

August is coming to a close. When you say goodbye to August, you say hello to September and that means fall is upon us.

The garden is looking like a patchwork. Some flowers are blooming just like it is still spring and some have completely faded. The rugosas are sending up a few flowers but mostly are making their beautiful hips. The hydrangeas are fading into their fall hues. The crab apple tree that stands in the middle of many of my flowers is dropping it’s leaves and apples giving a distinct fall look.

While I do miss the freshness of spring, fall in my world is filled with wonderful things!

Today my “fun thing” was working in the garden and taking pictures of bloomers! I took a ton of pictures and here are the ones that made the “cut”…

Belinda's Dream of the Earth Kind Series ... available at https://www.chambleeroses.com/
Belinda’s Dream of the Earth Kind Series … available at https://www.chambleeroses.com/

 

Mary Rose - David Austin
Mary Rose – David Austin

 

Champagne Wishes - Ping Lim's Easy Elegance Series
Champagne Wishes – Ping Lim’s Easy Elegance Series

 

Pink Carpet Rose
Pink Carpet Rose

 

Julia Child - Floribunda from Weeks
Julia Child – Floribunda from Weeks

 

Zinnias are fabulous in the fall!
Zinnias are fabulous in the fall!

 

Roseraie de la Hay Rugosa - sending up springlike blooms. FRAGRANT
Roseraie de la Hay Rugosa – sending up springlike blooms. FRAGRANT

 

Quietness - a stunning, fragrant Buck rose. Available at https://www.chambleeroses.com/.
Quietness – a stunning, fragrant Buck rose. Available at https://www.chambleeroses.com/.

 

The Ingenious Mr. Fairchild - David Austin Roses
The Ingenious Mr. Fairchild – David Austin Roses

 

More Quietness...
More Quietness…

 

Apricot Drift Roses from Star Roses and Plants - still look like spring!
Apricot Drift Roses from Star Roses and Plants – still look like spring!

 


MORE FUN THINGS…

0uTYflBQohP0hOmKXfKwMgRhfVSlfMEcdPE54QFhrfcO_pdn2SVoVEkuiwNLH00qXCWYmn_iPcCf960WQvRqimIMT9Rasf3U9CHtBYzpprG5A-HlJXvjaVWye1fVZiVps4QpVUCs25lUcjJ58JmdfQQuXOAssIDb=w692-h394In two weeks I will travel to Syracuse, NY for the American Rose Society’s National Convention. The Rose Chat crew will be interviewing rose lovers and hearing their stories as well as acting as Rose Show Awards Masters of Ceremonies. We can’t wait! If you are going to Syracuse, we look forward to seeing you. Come find us at our booth!

 


Thanks for stopping by!


 

 

 

 

Rose Buzz: That was quick!

Rose Buzz_7_whiteWell, I counted the days until spring and that was great but it appears spring was anxious to leave. I think we had about 1 week of spring and now it is S U M M E R! And, around here that means the roses start blooming. If the heat continues, many of the roses will bloom 3  weeks early. While they are beautiful anytime, that does not bode well for my garden tours that are coming in early June! Sorry my garden club and master gardeners buddies … not sure what you will see in June but we’ll find something! 🙂

Today I made my last garden walk before leaving for P. Allen Smith’s Garden 2 Blog event in Little Rock, Arkansas. I simply can’t wait to be back at Moss Mountain with Allen and so many of my garden friends from all around the country … and Allen’s amazing rose garden should be at peak! More about this event here. More info and more pictures to come from Moss Mountain!


Here is what I found on my garden walk today…

ROSES…

Often the first to bloom, Harison Yellow, the Pioneer Rose. Welcome back friend; it has been too long! Read more about Harison’s rich history here.

IMG_5265

The Rugosas (fireworks of the spring garden) are showing a bit of color and hopefully will stall for a week so I can “experience” their beauty and fragrance.

Rugosa Theresa Bugnet is showing off her first bloom…

IMG_5291 1

Rugosa Blanc de Double Corbert … fragrant!

IMG_5275

Champagne Wishes … this is a rose I just bought and it came with open bloom. I think I am really going to like this lovely rose from Ping Lim’s Easy Elegance series. The tag line for this series is All the beauty but none of the work. I have several in this series and will share pictures and info as they bloom.


IMG_5276


ROSE COMPANIONS

Some of the rose companions are coming on strong as well.

Iris…

IMG_5269

 

IMG_5279

Peonies … should be stunning when I return!

IMG_5271

POTTING SHED BLOOM

Even the geranium cutting in the potting shed is in bloom!

IMG_5293

 


WHAT ABOUT YOU?

How are things in your garden this week? Have any Rose Buzz to share?

 

Rose Buzz_7_white

Bloom Thyme: It’s Coming Back!

You’ve been with me as we counted down the days until spring. It is here and just when I thought that winter had taken away all the pretty things forever, they started coming back. This week was a week of big change in the garden … from dark and dreary to beautiful rebirth! Take a look…

IMG_4513
Lovely little violets from Uncle Tony’s garden…
IMG_4484
Test roses from Star Roses and Plants… so excited! I’ll keep you posted!
IMG_4489
Star roses getting a dunk in Moo Poo tea before planting. 24 hours in moo poo tea will work wonders!
IMG_4464
Cistina Plum… lovely!
IMG_4527
Rugosas are getting ready for their fireworks!! Only a few more weeks!
IMG_4491
Rhododendrons always make me think of trips to Roan Mountain!
IMG_4529
Daffodils are bringing the sunshine in!
IMG_4514
The first and very fragrant lilac! Many more to come!
IMG_4522
Sand Cherry. LOVE IT!

 

Wishing you a lovely week and a…

Sweet Peas_Bloom Thyme Friday

Bloom Thyme Friday: Fall Cleanup

UPDATED OCTOBER 2018…

Many people ask … “What do you do with all those roses in the fall?” Really not much … I tend to keep it simple. There are other chores that get a lot more of our attention in the fall than the roses. Like leaves! We have a lot of trees and so there are a lot of leaves. Mr. G has that process well in hand — with power tools like his leaf blower and tractor.

As far as the rose companions are concerned, I don’t cut back my perennials and annuals until the spring–I love the winter interest they provide especially when the snow falls on the different plant shapes. And, those seed pods are very yummy to our birds who hang around.

Now for “all those roses.”  Many of my roses are known to be winter hardy because I know that it is very likely that we will have a harsh winter and I would advise you make decisions on the roses you buy based on your weather conditions throughout the year not just your spring and summer.

  • I will clean up the beds of diseased leaves and debris and add mulch were needed.
  • I will take those in pots into the garage to protect from the winter. They don’t require much, just a drink of water every few weeks.
  • I will provide a heavy layer of much for a few of the particularly tender roses or sentimental favorites that I would hate to lose, by adding 4-5″ of extra mulch.
  • I will tie up the long canes of the climbers. I can look out and see that Peggy Martin and Francis E. Lester has grown some long arching canes since I tied them up a few weeks ago.
  • I will also cut back any of the roses that are extra tall to about waist high to keep them from flapping in the winter winds.

For the rest of the roses, they are on their own. Most can take it, but I know that if we have a winter like we had last year, I will lose a few and it is to be expected. But, you know what that means, once I get over the emotion of the loss, I will celebrate the extra space for the new introductions.

Rugosas are some of the toughest roses I grow. They will be back next spring give us their own brand of fireworks and fragrance in the garden. Oh I just can’t wait. If you want to read more about FIREWORKS and FRAGRANCE in the garden, read on here.

IMG_1987
Roseraie de la Hay
IMG_1964 1
Blanc de Double Corbert
Roseraie de la Hay
Roseraie de la Hay and Hansa

Have a wonderful week and enjoy the garden down time!

bloom-thyme-friday

Bloom Thyme Friday: Exchanging Plants

This week at our rose society meeting I made out like a bandit. Many members brought plants to share! Either their old roses had sent up suckers that are easy to share or they were thinning their rose or rose companion “inventory.”

Either way, while we were looking over the plants being offered, I observed that it doesn’t matter whether my fellow rose society members are 30 something or nearly 90, they are equally “over the moon” excited about getting something new for their garden. I love that!

Here are the lovelies that were shared with me… 
Theresa Bugnet ... picture courtesy of Dammann's Gardens.
Theresa Bugnet … picture courtesy of Dammann’s Gardens.
Theresa Bugnet (Rugosa)
 
 
Belle Poitevine courtesy of marysplantfarm.com
Belle Poitevine courtesy of marysplantfarm.com
Belle Poitevine (Rugosa)
 
 

As you know I am smitten with Rugosas in general, so getting to add 2 more fragrant blooming machines to my garden makes me very happy. I wrote about my other rugosas a few weeks ago when they were in full bloom and you can see the pictures here.

Baldo Villegas pic courtesy of forloveofroses.com
Baldo Villegas pic courtesy of forloveofroses.com

Baldo Villegas (Mini Flora)

This beauty is named for my good friend and favorite “bug man” This rose is often seen on the awards table at rose shows. Very pretty. If you are interested in purchasing this rose, check with ForLoveofRoses.com.

Laguna Climber pic courtsey of http://EdmundsRoses.com
Laguna Climber pic courtsey of http://EdmundsRoses.com

Laguna Climbing Rose

I am told this rose is disease resistant and blooms all summer! Add to that old rose beauty and fragrance and I know this is going to be one of my very favorites! Read more about Laguna here.

Reblooming Iris
Reblooming Iris

Reblooming Yellow Iris

While I was visiting a friends garden last fall, this iris was blooming like it was spring. I just knew then I had to have it! So glad he remembered and brought them to me!

Our rose society  doesn’t have an “official” plant exchange, but we just may change that next year. Do you participate in plant exchanges?

THIS WEEK IN THE GARDEN…

We are getting much cooler temperatures and rain most days!

Grande Amore dressed up for the holiday!
Yesterday’s unexpected but very welcomed rain!

I wish you a very happy BLOOM THYME FRIDAY and THE LADY is helping me wish you a HAPPY 4TH OF JULY!

Let Freedom Ring!!
Let Freedom Ring!!

Bloom Thyme Friday: The Charm of Rugosas

Rugosa roses are species roses native to eastern Asia. These profuse spring bloomers are hardy in Zones 3 – 9 and in a variety of conditions: heat, cold, wind, even salty, sandy seaside conditions. Rugosa roses prefers full sun (6-8 hours per day) and average well-drained soil. So, with very minimal care, almost anyone, anywhere can enjoy these dependable workhorses in the garden.  As for their size, Hansa, Roseraie de la Hay, Theresa Bugnet and Blanc de double Corbert  are 5′ X 5′ in my garden. Moje Hammerly is 4′ X 4′ and Belle Poitevine is 4 X4 too. There are other rugosas that are smaller in general … do some investigating to find the ones most suited for your location. For more on rugosas, go to the ARS website HERE.

These rugged plants are excellent choices for the organic gardener. Their distinct wrinkled (regose) foliage is very disease resistant.

In my cottage garden they are the back drop and anchor for many of my flower beds. They give me a most outstanding introduction to the garden season with their striking, prolific bloom and the intense fragrance that permeates the entire garden. And, as repeat bloomers, they provide fragrant blooms throughout the season. And, beautiful roses hips to enjoy in our fall garden.

Nothing in my garden is quite like the first bloom cycle of my rugosa roses. See what you think…

IMG_2047IMG_2031 IMG_1995

Hansa
Hansa

Hansa: Beautiful foliage and striking magenta blooms.

IMG_2210
Moje Hammarberg

Moje Hammarberg: More compact in growth but equal in bloom power and fragrance.

Roseraie de la Hay
Roseraie de la Hay

Roseraie de laHay: My favorite and the largest of the rugosas in my garden. named for the French rose garden of the same name

 

Blanc de double Corbert
Blanc de double Corbert

Double de Coubert: Pure white flowers and strong fragrance.

If you have some space and are looking for a rose with a major impact, think about rugosas!

Bloom Thyme Friday

HAPPY BLOOM THYME FRIDAY!