Bloom Thyme Friday: Add. Subtract. Relocate. 

Yes, this week has been about adding, subtracting and relocating.

ADD.

Take a look! I went shopping and found these beautiful plants on sale. Just what I needed for my new project!


New Project: I am adding new perennials to extend my border of cutting flowers. I’ll also add roses, herbs, ground covers and some annuals in the spring! For now I’m getting these beautiful bargains planted! 

Border this July…

Current situation … Buckets, tools and pots everywhere!

It’s Phenomenal!

One of the plants I am adding is a new lavender I found! Phenomenal Lavender is said to be a winter hardy variety that is also disease resistant as well as heat and humidity resistant. I plant lavender every year and have tried several varieties but the “come back” rate is low. Phenomenal Lavender was named Must Grow Perennial for 2013 by Better Homes and Gardens. Let’s hope it lives up to it’s name! Have you grown it?

Jackson and Perkins has “Phenomenal” for sale, if you are interested. Here.

Perle d’Or Rose

Chamblee Roses is sending me two Perle d’Ors next week. I can’t wait to have these roses.

This picture is from the Antique Rose Emporium website (link)

Perle d’Or is a fragrant old garden rose that was bred in France and introduced in 1884. In this country, this rose has been tested through the Earth Kind program, proven itself and came out on top in 2007 when it was named Earth Kind Rose of the Year.  Some articles say it is good for Zone 5 or warmer and some say Zone 6. With this in mind, I plan to keep these little babies in the potting shed this winter and have them in containers on the deck next summer. It may be a few years before I plant them in the ground.

SUBTRACT.

One of the few things I am subtracting this year is a beautiful rose that came down with Crown Gall. I had never had gall in my rose garden before—actually I had never even seen it before except in pictures. Needless to say I am not a fan. I took some good advice and removed the plant. If you want to know more about this yucky stuff, read on. #gross #enoughsaid 😷😳

RELOCATE.

I have been grooming a tiny Peggy Martin Rose I was given to have a prominent place in the garden. The location has been decided … on the trellis by the porch of my potting shed. I know. I know. She could get very happy and engulf the potting shed. But today I am okay with that. Having this rose in this space will bring me so much pleasure. My tiny little plant has grown 4′ this year and is ready to move.

I have not been sure what I wanted in this space since I lost my gorgeous New Dawn 3 years ago to RRD. It was heartbreaking, but now I’m going to give Peggy a chance to add the wow to the entrance to my special place.

Here is a picture of 4-year old Peggy on one of my arbors in early June.

Want to see New Dawn in her prime! Here she is…

Yes, she has been missed but hope springs eternal for gardeners and next spring we will watch Peggy grow!

I don’t know about where you are but our weather has turned cold! I don’t know what this early cold snap says about our winter! Mr. G is hoping for a lot of snow. He might just get it.

I usually wish you a happy bloom thyme Friday. And, I do wish you all the best, but it is hard for me to say the word happy. My friends in Texas are on my mind and in my heart constantly. Let’s keep praying for them and helping where we can.

Bloom Thyme Friday: Fall Cleanup

Many people ask … “What do you do with all those roses in the fall?” Really not much … I tend to keep it simple. There are other chores that get a lot more of our attention in the fall than the roses. Like leaves! We have a lot of trees and so there are a lot of leaves. Mr. G has that process well in hand — with power tools like his leaf blower and tractor.

As far as the rose companions are concerned, I don’t cut back my upright perennials and annuals until the spring–I love the winter interest they provide especially when the snow falls on the different plant shapes. For those that are low and spreading, I do remove them as they can become a host to undesirables.

Now for “all those roses.”  Many of my roses are known to be winter hardy because I know that it is very likely that we will have a harsh winter and I would advise you make decisions on the roses you buy based on your weather conditions throughout the year not just your spring and summer.

  • I will clean up the beds of diseased leaves and debris and add mulch were needed.
  • I will take those in pots into the garage to protect from the winter. They don’t require much, just a drink of water every few weeks.
  • I will provide a heavy layer of much for a few of the particularly tender roses or sentimental favorites that I would hate to lose by adding 4-5″ of extra mulch.
  • I will trim or tie up the long canes of the climbers once we have had 2 hard freezes and the danger of their growing has passed. Today as I came up the driveway, I noticed that Zepherine Drouhin has had a growth spurt and is throwing out arching canes from around her trellis. So, she is going to be tied up!
  • I will also cut back any of the roses that are extra tall to about waist high to keep them from flapping in the winter winds.

For the rest of the roses, they are on their own. Most can take it, but I know that if we have a winter like we had last year, I will lose a few and it is to be expected. But, you know what that means, once I get over the emotion of the loss, I will celebrate the extra space for the new 2015 introductions. Even though I sound tough, I have to tell you I still grieve a bit over the loss of my huge 15-year old New Dawn last spring. I may never fully recover from that one. Remember that story?? If you didn’t see the pictures of the Now You See It, Now You Don’t article, you can take a look here. Yes, that loss just about did me in. It took the bloom season of my rugosas to get me through it! And what a season they had. My rugosas just smiled in the face of the Polar Vortex. That’s just the way they are. Bless their hearts! xo

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Roseraie de la Hay
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Blanc de Double Corbert
Roseraie de la Hay
Roseraie de la Hay and Hansa

Have a wonderful week and happy…

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Bloom Thyme Friday: A Week of Extremes

This week has been a week of extremes. Extreme heat & humidity; extreme storms (even a tornado touch down within 10 miles of us); and EXTREME visits by the not so welcomed moles.

I have been on an “extreme” Japanese beetle watch since so many of my online garden friends are reporting beetle invasions in their gardens. The last two years we have seen very few and wouldn’t it be nice it that continued. If you are interested in reading more about Japanese Beetles (and who wouldn’t!?!), check out my friend Lynn Hunt’s article–Meet the Beetles.

Back to moles….

Have you ever dealt with moles? Do you have any advice on what we should do?  Mr. G is on “mole” detail and maybe it’s better if I don’t even know what he is going to do about it. Might not be pretty.

But, speaking of pretty, there are some pretty blooms this week. Most of the roses are taking a break but some are keeping on! And, many of the rose companions are just starting to take center stage! (Click on any of the pictures below to start the gallery feature.)

 

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HAVE A WONDERFUL WEEKEND AND HAPPY BLOOM THYME FRIDAY!